News & Publications

CTV News Profile 08.26.2016 Short clip of latest CIHR-funded AYMP Pathways Team Gathering in Winnipeg. Video Here.

Dr. McGavock Receives National Award This year, we are grateful to the Canadian Diabetes Association for awarding Dr. McGavock with the Frederick Banting Award which is given annually to an individual or organization that "has significantly contributed to either preventing diabetes and chronic disease in Canada, or to improving the quality of life of individuals affected by diabetes nationwide".

Meet a researcher -  Profile for World Fitness Day published in Teddy news

What is the DREAM Theme? via myhealthywaist.org. Interview with me during the International Chair in Cardiometabolic Health Meeting in Quebec City 2015. Video here

Evidence Network Op-Ed 02.06.2016 Wab Kinew has been telling scientists and health care professionals for years that culture is medicine. Epidemics of obesity, diabetes, infectious diseases and suicide that plague First Nation children across Canada are complex and multi-faceted. Read article here.

A Matter of DEVOTION 05.31.2016 ed by researchers Jon McGavock and Andrew Halayko, the new initiative is called the Developmental Origins of Chronic Disease Network, or DEVOTION for short.

As the name implies, DEVOTION's mandate is to facilitate local research into the early development of chronic childhood diseases, specifically asthma and Type 2 diabetes. This is a relatively new field of inquiry, which essentially asks whether environmental factors may affect the onset of disease.

Read entire article here

PHE Canada National Healthy Schools Conference 12.18.2016  

 Physical and Health Education Canada (PHE Canada) released 5 videos that capture highlights of the 2015 Healthy School Communities National Forum (the Forum). The videos summarize the keynotes by Dr. Jon McGavock and Sean Slade, and interview delegates on how to create healthy school communities. At the Forum from November 16-17, 2015 in Ottawa-Gatineau, over 200 delegates discovered strategies for fostering a healthy school community, shared success stories, heard the latest data and research, and were motivated to affect positive change in their school jurisdictions.

See article here

Get outside and do it for your mind                                               UM Today 06.23.15

If you’re working out to lose weight, Dr. Jonathan McGavock would say you’re focusing on the wrong goal: you should be active for your mental health.
 

 

Go play outside: Outdoor time promotes P.A. in youth
Science Daily 06.10.14

The World Health Organization recommends that youth participate in a minimum of 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) each day. Studies have shown that youth experience most of their MVPA during school hours. Therefore, it stands to reason that increasing outdoor time after school hours would increase MVPA. Researchers have now confirmed that time spent outdoors after school was positively associated with MVPA.

Kids need at least seven minutes a day of 'vigorous' physical activity...
Science Daily  11.09.12

Children need a minimum of seven minutes a day of vigorous physical activity, demonstrates recently published findings by University of Alberta medical researchers and their colleagues across Canada.

Letting kids help kids
Mentoring program fights weight problems

The Winnipeg Free Press
Wave Magazine  02.11.14

A remarkable University of Manitoba and provincial government study suggests older kids counselling younger kids in nutrition and activity can reduce childhood diabetes by at least 15 per cent...

Tackling Type 2 diabetes
WinnipegHealthRegion.ca
Wave Magazine 01.12.12

Studying how physical activity can be used to reduce the risk of Type 2 diabetes is near and dear to Dr. Jon McGavock's heart.

In fact, his research focuses on the cardiovascular complications in youth that are associated with Type 2 diabetes. His work in this area has taken him to the Garden Hill First Nation. Located in northeast Manitoba, Garden Hill has a Type 2 diabetes rate that's 400 to 500 times higher than the general population.